The Urinary System – Filtration

Last week, we talked about the basics of the urinary system, including the organs involved. This week, let’s take a closer look at what happens in the kidney, starting with filtration. The posts will be segmented because there will be a lot of new terms coming your way, and I would hate for you to get overwhelmed! So let’s learn how our bodies makes our pee, step by step.

Parts of the kidney

The basic functional unit within the kidneys is known as the nephron. This consists of all of the numbered portions, starting at the glomerulus (5) and ending at the distal tubule (6). 

The main components involved in filtration are the arteries, and the glomerulus.

Filtration

It is at the Bowman’s capsule where the filtration of blood occurs. The blood from the renal artery (renal means ‘kidney’) flows into a smaller version of an artery, known as the afferent arteriole. The name sounds weird, but ‘afferent’ basically means ‘towards something’. So this arteriole is moving blood towards the glomerulus. So this arteriole can also be referred to as the afferent glomerular arteriole.

The afferent arteriole then branches to form tiny blood vessels known as capillaries. These capillaries form a ball-like structure, which is part of the glomerulus (5). The capillaries are therefore called the glomerular capillaries.

The blood from the capillaries continues to flow into the next vessel, which is another arteriole, named the efferent arteriole. ‘Efferent’ means ‘away from something’, so the blood is moving away from the glomerulus. So this arteriole can also be referred to as the efferent glomerular arteriole.

This movement of the blood increases the amount of pressure within the capillaries, causing fluids to leak out. These fluids pass through a filter-like membrane, known as the glomerular basement membrane. Some substances are too large to pass through the basement membrane and, therefore, continue to circulate through the bloodstream.

The filtrate that goes through the glomerular basement membrane enters the Bowman’s capsule. The space inside the Bowman’s capsule is continuous with the rest of the tubule, which includes the proximal tubule, the loop of Henle and the distal tubule. The filtrate is concentrated and modified within these components of the tubule, which will be discussed next week.

And that is, thankfully, all there is to the filtration process for the urinary system! Next week, we’ll learn about what happens to the filtrate in the tubule.

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One thought on “The Urinary System – Filtration

  1. Pingback: The Urinary System – Selective Reabsorption | Know Your Body and Health

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