Hangover Remedies: Food

It’s Friday, and that means a lot of you are planning to spend a night on the town. Drinking with your buddies can be a good time, but don’t start your Saturday hating your past self for drinking too much. Take some precautions to make sure you can have a good time and still feel great the next day!

In general, eat food

When alcohol enters your stomach, it stimulates the release of more acid, which can lead to nausea. To prevent nausea and damage to your stomach lining, having food in your stomach will lessen the impact of the acid; the food would act sort of like a buffer! Just don’t eat too much, otherwise you may end up feeling sicker even faster just because you have a full stomach.

Carbs, Carbs, Carbs –before and after drinking

Carbs, otherwise known as carbohydrates, can be your best friend. Eating some pasta or bread before drinking can help your body slow down how fast it absorbs alcohol. With carbohydrates in your system, they will act as a buffer for the acids that are released, reducing their impact.

Fatty foods –before drinking
Fatty foods are especially great at protecting your stomach from the effects of alcohol, as they stick to your stomach lining really well. This will help prevent any excessive damage by the acid secretion and slow down the absorption of alcohol, so that you don’t quickly feel as inebriated as you ought to be.
Fatty foods –after drinking
A lot of people swear by this “remedy”, but fatty foods aren’t actually the best remedy the day after drinking. They will make you feel more nauseous than you already are. Though this isn’t true for everyone, it holds true for most. 
Eggs –after drinking
Eggs are the saviours for most hangovers. They are a great source of energy and biologically help you out when you’re suffering from a hangover. You see, eggs contain a large amount of cysteine, which is an amino acid. This amino acid helps breakdown acetaldehyde (remember last week’s post? This is one of those congeners!). So it’s pretty great at removing the effects of a hangover.
Bananas-after drinking
Bananas are a great source of potassium, which is an important electrolyte in helping our bodies retain water. So eating a banana after a night of drinking will help your body regain its original electrolyte levels.
Water, water, water!
As always, I will emphasize that drinking water is incredibly important. You lose a lot of fluids when you drink, so drinking water will help you recover and feel less of a headache the next day.

Hangover – Congeners

So we’ve talked about a couple of things that create the after-effects of a drunken night out, but we haven’t talked about the alcohol itself.

Different alcohols have different effects on our bodies, and that is partially due to the presence of congeners.

What are congeners?

In terms of alcohol, congeners are the byproducts of fermentation other than ethanol that our bodies find difficult to process. They are toxic chemical compounds, such as acetone, acetaldehyde, aldehydes, esters, tannins, and other chemical structures. They contribute the taste and aroma of the alcoholic beverages.

How do congeners play a role in hangovers?

Scientists have found a direct correlation between higher concentrations of congeners and the severity of hangovers. So the more acetone, acetaldehyde, aldehyde, ester and tannin molecules you have in your drink, the worse your hangover will be the next day.

Drinks and their relative congener concentrations

A rule of thumb for figuring out if your drink has a lot of congeners in it is to look at how dark it is. Dark liquors like scotch, whiskey, tequila, in addition to wine, have far more congeners in them, meaning they will give you quite a headache the next day if you don’t take the necessary pre- and post-cautions (rehydration, for example). Clearer alcohols, like vodka, gin, white wine, and rum have less congeners in them, which means they won’t be as hard on you the next day (as long as you don’t drink too much!).

Also, cheaper alcohols tend to have more congeners than their more expensive counterparts. This is most likely because they are of a lesser quality substrate, meaning there is more non-ethanol byproducts produced, whereas the expensive alcohol will have been produced from a higher quality substrate.

And there is your easy guide to alcohol. There’ll be more to come later!

Hangovers – Headaches

Hello Children, it’s time to learn about one of the many upsetting effects of alcohol. Okay, I know most of you are probably people actually going through a hangover and you want to know why this is happening to you… I mean, you’re a good person (probably). So why oh why is last night hurting you today?

What is a hangover?

Unlike the movie ‘The Hangover’, where the characters pretty much go on an adventure the day after a rowdy night with seemingly no physical repercussions other than a couple tattoos, a hangover would probably make you want to sleep for a whole day.

A hangover, formally called a veisalgia, is basically the umbrella term for the after effects of drinking. It includes headaches, body aches, tiredness, weakness, thirst, nausea (sometimes vomiting), general stomach pain, diarrhea, and a slew of other symptoms like depression, vertigo and decreased attention.

Of course, you won’t likely experience all of these symptoms at once! There are different hangovers and they depend on how much you drink and how well your body is at detoxifying the alcohol. If you drink a lot and your body detoxifies alcohol at a very slow rate, then you will likely have an extremely bad hangover (unless you take some precautions – which will be explored in a later post!).

Why do we get hangovers?

If you recall last week’s post, where we discussed the effects of alcohol on the body, alcohol inhibits a hormone. This hormone, the antidiuretic hormone, is responsible for the reabsorption of water by your body’s kidneys. Without the activity of this hormone, the water that would have been retained by your body goes straight to your bladder and is then excreted. This loss of water results in your body becoming dehydrated, which leads to you getting a hangover.

Headaches and Hangovers, oh my!

Even though you are consuming a form of liquid, the amount of alcohol consumed is not as much as the amount of water lost during urination. This dehydrated state is what causes your headache, as the organs in your body are trying to their best to retain as much water as possible – even if that means stealing water from your brain. This results in your brain shrinking in size, making the membranes that connect your brain to your skull stretch – thus your headache. Crazy, huh?

Next week, we’ll talk about the relationship between Electrolytes and Hangovers.