Prostate

When I hear November, I think ‘Movember’. The month of the ‘staches. And just like their moustaches, females are unable to have the type of cancer that the month raises awareness for: prostate cancer. But what is the prostate? What does it do normally? Warning: Children, talk to your parents if you’re reading this. There’s a wee wee on here.

What is the prostate?

The prostate is an organ only found in men. It sits below the bladder and wraps around the urethra (which is a tube that carries urine [and sperm for men] from the bladder to the external environment). It has three lobes: the left, center and right lobes, and is part muscle and part glandular.

Now pick up a walnut. That’s approximately the size of a man’s prostate. That’s pretty small for an organ!

So what does this walnut-sized organ do?

The prostate is important for secreting fluid that is slightly alkaline, which will form part of the seminal fluid. The seminal fluid is the fluid that carries sperm from the urethra to the tip of the penis.

The prostate also helps in male climax (or orgasm). Its muscular portion will help the propelling of sperm and its own secreting fluid into the urethra, where it will then exit.

The Male Reproductive System, including the prostate.

The growth of cells in the prostate is stimulated by the male hormone, testosterone.

And those are the basics of the prostate! Join me next week when we talk more about the prostate.

 

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Breast Health

The month of October was Breast Cancer Awareness Month, so naturally I’m talking about Breast Health on the first of November. But since all diseases need year-long awareness, let me carry this one into November.

Who needs to monitor their breast health?

We all have breasts! That’s right, breasts for everyone! The only difference between female and male breasts is that male breasts lack specialized lobules, which are divisions of the breast required to aid in the production and excretion of milk. Apparently, Mother Nature thought men didn’t need to be able to produce milk, but I’m sure there are plenty of mothers out there that would argue otherwise.

Either way, there is only one difference between male and female breasts, which means that both women and men need to continuously monitor their breast health.

Why monitor breast health?

Breast cancer usually originates in the lobules of your breasts, which is probably a super great reason to keep an eye on them. And a scary one.

But I thought men don’t have lobules, so why do they get breast cancer? is probably what you’re thinking. Well, calm down, I’ll explain.

Men don’t have the lobules required to produce milk; they do, however, have lobules. The good ol’, regular lobules that give your breast its mass. So guys, girls, everyone, check your breasts regularly.

How do you do it though?

Here are some tips brought to us by the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation:

  • Know how your breasts normally look and feel
  • Look and feel for changes, such as
    • Lumps
    • Thickening of the skin
    • Nipple changes and/or discharges
    • Redness of any part of the breast
    • Skin changes (rashes, colour, etc)
    • Dimpling or puckering of the skin or nipple
    • Swelling or pain in the breast area or under arm

Make sure to look and feel at each of these regions:

  • Each whole breast
  • Under and above each breast
  • Under both arms

If you’re ever worried, contact your family physician and set up an appointment. It is always better to be safe.

Next week we’ll look at the established Risk factors for Breast cancer to keep this ball of awareness rolling. Hope your Halloween night was great! Stay safe, lovelies! 🙂

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