Alcohol – Effects on the Body

I’m a university student and you can bet that I’ve seen a lot of people under the influence of alcohol. They can be loud, giggly, emotional, and sometimes really tired.

I wanted to see just what effects alcohol has on our bodies, so posts about the different effects of alcohol will be popping up every now and then. For now, I thought it would be cool to see the list of effects alcohol has been found to have on our bodies.

Some of these effects are real extremes, so take them lightly. 🙂

List of the effects of alcohol on our body

Short-term effects

  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Makes you urinate more frequently (stay tuned, we’ll be talking about this one shortly!)
  • Flushed appearance
  • Reduced cognitive and motor skills(which is why you shouldn’t drink and drive!)
  • Loss of inhibitions and more confidence
  • Blurred vision (aka beer goggles) and slurred speech
  • Intense moods, e.g. aggression, elation, depression
  • Headache
  • Blackouts
  • Alcohol poisoning, which is really lethal

Diseases/conditions (in extreme cases!!!)

  • Can lead to the development of heart disease after long-term excessive use.
  • Potential cancer developing effects
  • May cause pancreatitis, which can lead to the development of diabetes
  • Liver disease
  • High blood pressure
  • Depression and/or anxiety
  • Weakened immune system
  • Anemia

Effects on our reproductive systems?!

  • Linked to damaging fertility (extreme case)
  • Small amounts of alcohol can affect a woman’s menstrual cycle
  • Alcohol can reduce the amount of testosterone a man produces
  • May affect the quality of a man’s sperm

And this is just a sampling of all of the effects of alcohol. In a couple of weeks, we’ll be talking about urination so that we can get to explore the effects of alcohol on it the week after :).

So, take it easy with eggnog for now, ladies and gents. No need to binge drink, it may just lead to some unhealthy effects!

I will be on hiatus until the first week of January, due to the holidays but Happy holidays and Happy New Year 🙂 Stay safe!

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Risk Factors for Breast Cancer

Last week, we talked about breast cancer and how you can take certain steps to be aware of your breast health.
This week, we’ll look at a list of risk factors that have been linked to the development of breast cancer. By knowing these risk factors ahead of time, we can help in reducing our risk of breast cancer.
Risk factors
Risk factors increase one’s chances of developing breast cancer. Studies that have looked for risk factors look for things that are common in people who develop breast cancer than in others. You should know thought that risk factors don’t always act at the same magnitude, so take this with a grain of salt. Risk factors don’t always lead to the disease, so please don’t create a checklist and start to freak out. It’ll really help no one.
Luckily, some risk factors are modifiable so you do have some control over your health. Others aren’t as easy to hear about, as they might have to do with your genes, or other uncontrollable traits.

Modifiable Risk Factors for Breast Cancer

  • Body weight
  • Physical activity
  • Alcohol use
    • is a known carcinogen (cancer-inducing agent).
    • Depends on how much you drink and how often
  • Smoking
  • Hormone replacement therapy and contraceptives
    • Estrogen and progesterones can sometimes increase our risk of breast cancer
    • Synthetic hormones can also increase this risk
  • Pregnancy and breastfeeding
    • Having gone through pregnancy and breastfeeding can actually lower your risk of getting breast cancer. Now, I’m not saying “Go make babies now!”. But, I mean, babies are cute…
    • Having a child after the age of 35 may bring about a slight increase of risk, much like not having a child at all (This is just for you, ladies. Men, your breasts don’t care if you have kids or not)
  • Radiation exposure

Non- modifiable Risk factors

  • Gender and age
    • Women have a greater risk than men because of those specialized lobules they have.
    • Risk increases as you age
  • History of cancer (family or personal)
  • Early menstruation/late menopause
  • Breast density or conditions
  • BRCA gene mutations

Factors that aren’t risk factors

  • Deodorants or antiperspirants
  • Bras
  • Breast Implants
  • Stress
  • Abortion

Now remember, risk factors don’t always lead to the disease but it’s always good to look after yourself! So take care, know your body and stay healthy 🙂

References

Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation. 2013. Breast Cancer Risk Factors. CBCF.org. http://www.cbcf.org/central/AboutBreastHealth/PreventionRiskReduction/risk_factors/Pages/default.aspx. November 7, 2013.

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