Fainting and Blood Pressure

A while ago, my friend asked me if blood pressure had anything to do with fainting. I said, “Yup”, and she said, “Explain it to me later”. So welcome to Later, everyone!

What is fainting?

For the people who don’t know, fainting is the loss of consciousness due to a lack of oxygen reaching the brain. Fainting also has a medical name, Syncope. It’s pronounced sing-co-pee (English is a strange language).

Why do people faint?

Biologically, people faint because they experience low blood pressure (though, there can be other cardiovascular problems). This isn’t necessarily of medical concern; you can have low blood pressure for several reasons. For example, if you are dehydrated, you have less fluid in your blood stream. This means that you have a lower blood volume in your blood vessels, which results in a lower blood pressure.

When you have low blood pressure, your blood vessels lose their tone and are unable to deliver blood cells to your brain as efficiently as it would if you had normal blood pressure. This results in your brain receiving less oxygen. The lack of oxygen is what makes you lose consciousness, since oxygen is required for the sustenance of your brain cells, not to mention your other cells!

So what can I do?

Stay hydrated folks! That’s one of the simplest ways to maintain a normal blood pressure 🙂

And that’s how blood pressure is related to fainting!

 

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Blood Pressure

High blood pressure, low blood pressure, what are you saying, doctors? What is blood pressure and why should we care?

What is blood pressure?

Blood pressure is the pressure that your blood exerts on the blood vessels. I know…. that’s a bit redundant.

Let me explain blood pressure a bit more, so you can visualize this. From what we’ve learned in school, the molecules in fluids interact closely with one another, meaning that they will not fill the entirety of a container unless you’ve placed enough of that fluid into the container to fill it completely. Each molecule exerts its own amount of force on each other and on the portion of the surface of the container that it interacts with.

Pressure is defined as a force exerted on a particular area. So the amount of force that the molecules exert on a particular portion of a container’s surface is equivalent to the pressure exerted by the molecule onto the container.

Now, if you replace the fluid with blood serum,the molecules with blood cells and the container with blood vessels, you’ll have the same situation; the blood cells each exert its own amount of force on portions of the blood vessel, which is the blood pressure.

Blood pressure naturally increases when your heart contracts to push blood into the blood vessels, and decreases when your heart relaxes.

Why is blood pressure important?

Blood pressure determines how hard your heart has to work to continuously feed your circulatory system with blood. The harder your heart works, the more strain there is in your circulatory system. This can lead to higher risk for health problems.

It’s also important to note that there are a variety of factors that affect blood pressure including how active you are, how much rest you get, your body temperature, diet, posture, medications and even your emotional state. So it’s important to try and stay healthy and active, for your heart and your health!

Pins and Needles aka Parasthesia

Nowadays, it seems like my legs get a lot more sleep than I do. “#firstworldproblems, #universitywoes”. But, really, why do our limbs fall asleep and why do they tingle us so uncomfortably when they do?

Pins and Needles

The sleeping of our limbs, also termed ‘parasthesia’, is the result of our nerves acting abnormally due to an increased pressure on them for a prolonged period of time. Our nerves essentially act as little messengers between our limbs and our brain. So this prolonged pressure on the nerves results in the loss of communication between the limbs and our brain.

There is also a prolonged pressure placed on our blood vessels, which results in our nerves not receiving enough oxygen or nutrients.

So, in response to this pressure, nerves, much like how we respond to pressure, can react in to different ways: They can either become unresponsive and wait until the pressure has been removed, or they will essentially begin to spaz out and rapidly send signals in hopes of sending them in the right direction.

Now, the latter causes a problem because we have a lot of different nerves feeding our brains with a lot of different information: some inform us about temperature, some others about pressure on our skin and so forth. So when the nerves start spastically sending signals, the brain is unable to fully interpret what is happening and gets a mix of signals about warmth and numb sensations as well as conflicting signals about being cold and tingling sensations. This is why our sleeping limbs are described as having pins and needles. The mix of signals results in a mix of sensations, including an odd duality of numbness and tingling.

How to wake up your limbs

Many people try to hit their limbs that have fallen asleep. That doesn’t really do anything, unfortunately. The best we can do is to change our positions to remove the pressure and wait for the blood flow and nerve responses to return to normal.

And that’s all there is to know about pins and needles. Ironically, my foot has now fallen asleep so it’s time to practice what I preach.

 

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